Our annual Gardens for Good contest is now open for applications!

Our Gardens for Good grant supports community garden projects to grow organic food and nourish their communities. This year we’ve expanded our support to give 21 gardens $5,000 each. 

The voting period is open until April 7th 

Once voting closes, we will choose 21 winners based on the number of votes they receive AND an internal review of the applications.

VOTE FOR YOUR FAVOURITE GARDEN

31
votes

10th Street Community Garden

Dallas, TX, United States
31
votes

10th Street Community Garden

Dallas, TX, United States

This garden is located on a vacant lot owned by the Executive Director of our partner non-profit, For Oak Cliff. It is now will always be a community cultivation space. Our garden supports the resilience and health of this community by reintroducing the practice of cooperative cultivation. It is empowering operation as this community was one of the original Freedman Towns of Dallas. The formerly enslaved people settled there and their legacy lives in the garden as seen on the mural in the attached picture. This garden stands as a testament to the strength of the community those Free Men and Women built so many years ago and our responsibility to continue to build a resilient future for the next generation.

Vote for this garden
8
votes

222 Cares Garden

Glenburn, ME, United States
8
votes

222 Cares Garden

Glenburn, ME, United States

Our garden roughly 7 acres located on our family property in central Maine. Through a generous donation of a greenhouse frame, and already owned equipment, we intend to provide community access to growing from seedling to harvest for Veterans and their Support Teams as well as a local church group that runs a food pantry. Our sincere hope is to help teach people how to grow sustainably at the garden as well as provide supplies for raised bed and deck growing for those with space. Through individuals, and the food pantry, we estimate that we will reach an audience of 300 or more.

Vote for this garden
693
votes

490 Farmers

Rochester, NY, United States
693
votes

490 Farmers

Rochester, NY, United States

490 Farmers seeks to use urban agriculture as a platform for eliminating food insecurity, providing land access to urban dwellers, and creating opportunities for sustainability education & community building that enhance the quality of life for Rochester residents, and help push our city toward a more resilient and equitable future. By providing garden plots, tools and resources to families to grow their own food and learn about gardening, we are helping to create a more resilient, self-sustaining community that has a safe space to call their own. Our garden also helps with social integration of the homeless population by providing them with free garden plots and a safe and welcoming space that facilitates interaction between neighbors of all backgrounds.

We address environmental issues by practicing a permaculture driven approach to our communal growing spaces where we have a beehive, many native pollinator plants, rain catchment system and community composting. These also serve to educate and provide an example of these systems for the general public. We also have a Free Food Forest, a Children’s Garden, Little Free Pantry, U-Pick flower garden, and public gathering space. This year we will be introducing new programs including an Urban FoodBox (CSA) donation program to (produce goes to families in need of fresh food), a youth urban farming internship program with a neighboring high school, and a weekly Farmers Market in partnership with a neighboring church and local businesses.

Vote for this garden
11
votes

A Child’s Inspiration: Wildlife Discovery Garden

Philadelphia, PA, United States
11
votes

A Child’s Inspiration: Wildlife Discovery Garden

Philadelphia, PA, United States

Teach, Learn, Listen.
Educate, Inspire, Conserve.
Observe, Question, Engage.
Discover. Wonder. Bee.

Where Together, we explore nature, engage inspiration, & empower discovery. As everything connects, every new experience and every new challenge is a learning journey.

Our Mission is to provide a safe, nurturing, & inspiring environment supporting the whole child and their growth.

We Believe that learning happens holistically through relationships with people & wildlife in nature.
We Empower children through creativity & discovery to think for themselves while considering the environment & others.
We Envision curious, open-ended, meaningful, & engaging; STEAM-powered problem-solving & exploration.
We Strive for a natural environment that immerses us in joyful experiences.
We Value & Emphasize a multicultural, JEDI-focused, and age-appropriate approach that respects and honors All children as individuals, All families as unique, & of course, All of nature.
Understanding that a child’s work is discovery, inquiry, & play, we look for a balance of independence & community building.

We fully commit to a positive & supportive learning environment, inclusive, open to all learners, & sensitive to cultural diversity.

We believe that regular connections with the natural world encourage children to develop:
* Respect for local cultures and climates and themselves as a part of nature.
* Feelings of unity, peace, and well-being as global citizens.

We believe it is essential for children to:
* Be respected as competent, powerful learners and risk-takers who have a voice in what they create and learn through nature.
* Be supported in developing life skills through holistic nature-based learning.

We believe it is vital for families to:
* Understand the value of children’s daily connections with nature.
* Support children’s appropriate risk-taking and exploration in nature.
* Enjoy regular experiences in the natural world with their children.

We believe it is crucial for educators to:
* Allow enough time each day for children to explore freely in nature-based spaces.
* Support children’s appropriate risk-taking and adventurous play in nature.
* Provide children with opportunities for silence and contemplation in natural settings.
* Encourage children’s development of a sense of wonder and a sense of environmental stewardship.

At A Child’s Inspiration: Wildlife Discovery Garden, we strive to create learning experiences that are enriching, innovative, meaningful, and engaging. Our network of green spaces/gardens/wildlife sanctuaries, including our very our Discovery Garden, and green spaces/gardens/nature centers located in urban and suburban communities around the Greater Philadelphia area enable us to develop, evaluate, and sustain nature-based education and early childhood education programs in all settings.

Vote for this garden
22
votes

A Sip of Paradise Garden

Atlanta, GA, United States
22
votes

A Sip of Paradise Garden

Atlanta, GA, United States

A Sip of Paradise Garden was started in January 2020 as a bartenders community garden, we are a registered business in the state of Georgia and 501c3, we were blessed with. 25 acre from another nonprofit called Community Farmers Market. We have 45 plots and 35 members, our mission is to provide a safe space for bartenders to recharge their creativity, minds and themselves, here we can heal our broken community from years of issues and not this pandemic. We will take the support and get a water irrigation system, signage, a seating area and repair beds. We offer wellness activities such as meditation, yoga and pilates as well as composting workshops. We are building things to keep our hospitality community engaged and empowered.

Vote for this garden
9
votes

A&L 305 UNITED Garden

Brooklyn, NY, United States
9
votes

A&L 305 UNITED Garden

Brooklyn, NY, United States

A&L 305 United is a newly merged school (formerly PS 305 Dr. Peter Ray and Arts&Letters merged 2020/21) located in the 305 school building in Bed Stuy, Brooklyn. Both schools had long histories of serving their original communities (many of them low-income and/or BIPOC families), and the merger naturally raised concerns within them. As the pandemic did not allow us to proceed with any community-building events we planned, we understand the UNITED GARDEN as an opportunity to bring together our newly formed community in a joined, sustainable project. Besides a practical impact for our – on many levels – underserved community, the Garden will have strong symbolic meaning. It will function as an outdoor classroom, recreation/community area (with open hours for the surrounding public), and beautification project for ~700 students. Besides a dedicated school garden, we hope to integrate parts of the neighboring public Hattie Carthan playground into our project as pollinating grounds.

Vote for this garden
86
votes

ABC2 Community Farm of Hope, Prosperity and Change

Enfield, NC, United States
86
votes

ABC2 Community Farm of Hope, Prosperity and Change

Enfield, NC, United States

Our overall health outcomes have become a focal point in our rural communities of Halifax County. ABC2’s goal is to continue empowering young people to become Community Leaders/Advocates by creating a sustainable youth-led agriculture model of a Community Farm of Hope, Prosperity, Change to support youth led projects around health, economic development, and education.

The ABC2 World Changers program uses a custom designed curriculum to “empower young people by providing a life skills program that promotes positive values, healthy habits, and education through community development, culture, and awareness– resulting in real life power, World Changers as Game Changers.”

The overall Community Farm is a connector for the Access to Healthy Foods in our region. The Community Farm will serve as a place to grow, inspire, cultivate, and sustain our community through food, jobs, education, fun, and opportunity to build an innovative Food System for the community.

ABC2 is creating a Market Farm as a way for young people to obtain a lifestyle that focuses more on living off the land without making the switch to being fully reliant on farming for an income. Building a community infrastructure to be purely organic. Also, young farmers will grow individual specialized produce and edible flowers to have available at the Market Garden. ABC2 will support growing micro-greens and mushrooms as a collective community project to educate about growing produce and also teach the social enterprise of farming.

Vote for this garden
16
votes

ADSS Garden

Port Alberni, BC, Canada
16
votes

ADSS Garden

Port Alberni, BC, Canada

We took over the garden last year during Covid-19 as we could get together outside with a couple of students. We cleaned it as it was left wild since years… With the help of students who wanted to practice their French at the same time, we build a shelter and planted veggies. We paid all that investment by doing bottle drives in our community!! This year, we would love to have a water system as summers are very hot and dry here, and we also would like to have 2 picnic tables for our Cedar students ( our students with challenges), we need to raise our beds to make it easier for some of them to be able to access them, we need soil and a seeding program for our teachers to help them plant and enjoy the outsides.
Our students love to work in the garden but it’s very challenging at the moment as it is not well adapted for them yet. We are hopeful to have a grant as I said before, all our costs are paid by bottle drives made through our small community. Thank you very much for considering helping us!

Vote for this garden
1511
votes

AfriThrive Garden

Silver Spring, MD, United States
1511
votes

AfriThrive Garden

Silver Spring, MD, United States

AfriThrive Inc, a 501(C)3 nonprofit organization dedicated to building vibrant and thriving African immigrant and minority families in the greater Baltimore-Washington D.C area through increased access to culturally appropriate healthy foods. In response to the lack of culturally appropriate healthy foods, in 2013 we started an organic community gardening program in Montgomery County, Maryland. This garden involves a network of families, growing culturally appropriate varieties of African vegetables including black nightshades (managu), spider flower (chinsaga), pumpkins leaves, jute, tomatoes, black peas, swiss chard, collards, sweet potatoes, and okra.
Our gardening became more critical during the COVID-19 pandemic, as food insecurity emerged as a major threat among immigrant populations because of the pandemic-induced business paralysis and lockdowns. Although other food pantries provide food assistance, African immigrants do not consume canned food stuff. AfriThrive garden is special because we focus on culturally appropriate foods and empower the community including children to cultivate what they eat. These vegetables are distributed through AfriThrive food pantry reaching families most affected by food insecurity. On a weekly basis, we serve about 500 families in Montgomery county. During the off season, we procure the produce food in partnership with the county government and other food providers such as the DC Central Kitchen. Within the greater Washington DC, we serve more than 1100 immigrant families.

AfriThrive is seeking a $5,000 grant to expand its organic gardening program to benefit a total of 500 Montgomery residents who will receive food, attend the gardening education, and or become part of the gardening community. We will target Aspen Hill, White Oak, Wheaton, and Silver Spring cities because of the following reasons 1)They are considered food insecure, 2) a larger proportion of African immigrants live in these areas and 3) AfriThrive has a presence in these areas and plans to expand its organic gardening program at Briggs Chaney community and use existing networks to reach more families. Upon receipt of the funds, we will procure gardening inputs including organic manure, produce boxes and a refrigerated food carrier to preserve the vegetables while awaiting distribution. We will expand the garden with additional ¼ acre space plots. We renew garden permit annually with the county. African vegetables are labor-intensive undertaking and harvesting is time sensitive, therefore we will hire 4 laborers for additional support during the busy weeding and harvest pick seasons.

Vote for this garden
34
votes

Afrofuturist Farm Collaborative

Saint Louis, MO, United States
34
votes

Afrofuturist Farm Collaborative

Saint Louis, MO, United States

Afrofuturistic Farm Collaborative is a consortium of neighbors, professional artists, growers, and wellness practitioners in the Greater Ville Area of North Saint Louis. We are installing and plan to maintain a native plant educational garden, community and apprenticeship program. We have long term goals for a unique CSA! Our satellite site is an urban orchard. Our goal is to enhance the ecological impact of the neighborhood. Food Access does not have to look like a standard row of boxes! Through a diverse plant variation, pollinators, and dedication, everyone can learn how to grow their own food.

Growing food is our business. We are educators in the arts and wellness industry. Our programs show diverse, affordable and accessible growing methods. Dail Chambers and Simiya Sudduth are lifelong growers, artists and wellness entrepreneurs. We believe that as black indigenous birthing mothers, it is imperative to provide food access in urban neighborhoods. It is important for black people to learn to grow food. We offer a native plant educational garden to share in the indigenous beauty of our land. We pay respect to the first people and the first plants. The educational garden is alongside an accessible sidewalk for all.

Our community garden program, is a scheduled opportunity to grow with friends and neighbor. Join our community team of gardeners to grow together. We have a support network for new and emerging growers. Our apprenticeship program is for people who are adopting an agricultural lifestyle. Participants will learn how to develop and maintain a garden, access a community support network and grow food! Our apprenticeship program is a long-term commitment of at least three seasons. We will release applications soon. We are starting over on abandoned city lots after a major issues with demolition has impacted our grow season and contaminated our soil. We are black and indigenous, we work with a native wildflower garden, three sisters grow method and mound building in our practice. We are choctaw, cherokee and chickasaw.

Vote for this garden
24
votes

AILM~ELCA Community Garden

Reynoldsburg, OH, United States
24
votes

AILM~ELCA Community Garden

Reynoldsburg, OH, United States

There are thousands of people who do not know where their next day meal will come from. The AILM~ELCA Community was started to motivate communities that they can make use some of Nature’s gifts to feed themselves. Hence in 1919 we got a $24,000 (3-year) grant to make garden. We have 21 plots of garden land , on which we plant and produce, collard greens cabbage, sweet potatoes, okra, watermelon, tomatoes ,pepper,: These are all organic produce. The Gardeners are from Liberia , West Africa. Organic farming and gardening what we believe in , hence our gardens are that. Produce from our garden is distributed to the hungry in the Community; also cooked to feed the hungry. To sustain the project we do fundraising during harvest. People who like organic food come and harvest and make donations. Very successful project! during one of harvests, some visitors upon hearing about garden came from Indiana to purchase some natural palava sauce leaf (called jute leave in the US). We even cut collard greens, package and supply a restaurant of one of our sponsors. The Community has now realized the importance of organic gardening and that they can feed themselves just from making gardens. One visitor said, “now, I know where I can get organic greens.

Vote for this garden
19
votes

Aimee Gwinn’s Garden

Shady Spring, WV, United States
19
votes

Aimee Gwinn’s Garden

Shady Spring, WV, United States

16×24 foot. We let the kids help plant, care for, pick vegetables, clean, and can the produce. Our garden production is donated to the families in the facility as well as the neighbors around it.

Vote for this garden
732
votes

AIO Community Gardens

Rockland, ME, United States
732
votes

AIO Community Gardens

Rockland, ME, United States

Last year we broke ground on a new building. This year we’re breaking ground again, to create a 100% edible and organically maintained landscape so we can offer even more food – and food choices – to our community. Following the design principles of our inside space, which we modeled to look and feel like a grocery store, our clients will literally be able to pick what they want to eat fresh from our gardens.

Over the next five years we will transform the industrial wasteland of gravel and grass that currently surrounds our new space into growing goodness: fresh fruit (think apples, raspberries, blueberries, strawberries) and perennial vegetables (asparagus, arugula, and rhubarb) that give high yields with little maintenance. We’ll line the path in and out with hanging baskets, containers, and raised beds for traditional annual veggies – tomatoes, squash, lettuce, cabbage, cucumbers, peppers, peas, beans, beets and radishes – and turn our back yard into community garden plots open to anyone wanting to grow food for themselves or the pantry.

We are grounding our garden spaces in permaculture principles, letting what grows here now show us what we can grow tomorrow with minimal inputs. We’ll surround our fruit trees and shrubs with edible companions that attract beneficial insects, mine and share nutrients, and make our plantings as lovely to see as they are to eat! We’ll plant barrels at the edges of our roof to save rainwater for a sunny day and compost bins at garden edges to recycle food wastes for next year’s crops. We’ll keep our root cellar cool with a covering of fruiting vines and set up picnic tables in the shady areas where growing anything but wood chips would be a challenge. But the most important crops we are planting in this space won’t show on a garden plan or fill a berry basket.

We are growing community. We are growing resilience. We are growing a different way of approaching food security and better choices for our green spaces. We are combatting climate change by replacing energy-intensive lawns with plants that feed people, pollinators, and the planet. We are growing goodness.

Vote for this garden
1284
votes

Alief Community Garden

Houston, TX, United States
1284
votes

Alief Community Garden

Houston, TX, United States

The Alief Community Garden is an abundant fountain within a food desert. Alief is the most diverse community in the City of Houston. Since its creation in September 2011, the community garden is an ongoing collaborative partnership with the Alief Independent School District (landowners), the International District (land renters), the Alief Super Neighborhood Council (volunteer garden coordination), various community partners, as well as students and their families. We started with 20 beds and now have 85.

Since the garden’s inception, community members and students have grown food organically, benefitting Alief families and the Communities in School Office at Youngblood Intermediate. We added a tree farm, which was stocked twice from generous donations from the Apache Corporation. Volunteers planted the trees on esplanades in our community.

We collaborated with graduate students from the University of Houston’s Graduate Architecture Program and SPARK Park to establish an outdoor classroom that sometimes serves as a Farmer’s Market. We partnered with HOPE Clinic to buy two free-standing gazebos and furnished them with game tables.

In 2012 students engaged in an extensive campaign of daily online voting to win a fruit orchard from Dreyer’s Fruit Bars Communities Take Root Contest. We recently received a small grant from the City of Houston to expand and replace orchard trees that didn’t survive hurricanes and snow! We also plan to add pecan trees on the northern side of the property, courtesy of Trees for Houston.

If funded, we will expand our Beneficial Garden area by increasing the number of native plants which were damaged by Winter Storm Uri. Access to food, shelter, and water will serve to increase local pollinators that were decimated by prolonged periods of subfreezing temperatures and limited availability of food sources. Native plants, once established, require less maintenance and will complement/benefit our community garden.

Alief residents have benefited from a shared fellowship at the community garden. It has increased property values, given community members a place to congregate for cultural events, and serves as a sweet respite for people and pollinators. Creating wonder and verdant growth in a raised bed is a therapy for people of all ages.

Vote for this garden
111
votes

Allen County Community Orchard

Iola, KS, United States
111
votes

Allen County Community Orchard

Iola, KS, United States

The idea for an orchard first sprouted at Thrive Allen County, a nonprofit tackling the many challenges that our community faces. Allen County is a rural corner of Southeast Kansas suffering from the effects of poverty, chronic disease, underdevelopment, and population loss. These problems are cyclical and interwoven; to address one, we must address them all. Thrive Allen County takes a holistic approach to health, wellness, and economic development by activating the community to spark positive change.

We believe that something as simple as an orchard plays a big role in reviving our rural community. Green spaces like gardens encourage all kinds of benefits: physical activity, outdoor time, community connections, healthy eating, and more. Furthermore, creating this garden on previously vacant land brings new life and excitement to the town.

In 2019, the orchard finally took root on the south side of town. With help from a host of volunteers, Thrive Allen County planted apple, peach, and plum trees, blackberry and raspberry bushes, and dozens of strawberry plants. Since then, we’ve reaped the benefits of delicious fruit and healthy living.

We hope to use this grant to maintain and expand the community orchard. The garden operates with support from volunteers, who prune, water, weed, and harvest. Thrive Allen County leases the land from the City of Iola and pays for the water costs, relying on grants and donations to make our work possible. If our orchard is chosen for the Gardens for Good grant, we hope to purchase new maintenance tools, additional orchard plants, and larger trellises for our blackberry bushes.

The Allen County Community Orchard represents the type of future that we hope to see for our community: healthy, connected, and vibrant. Our orchard and our rural community have bright days ahead of them.

Vote for this garden
3
votes

alo

Saint George, UT, United States
3
votes

alo

Saint George, UT, United States

alo is locally developing amazing, sustainable food systems through advanced hydroponics to ensure that Utah will always have access to select, key foods. Unlike other food producers, our structure and our systems are designed to operate independently and irrespective of external conditions. Nothing – not even the loss of traditional supply chains – will prevent us from feeding our community. Build the Ark before it rains. World conditions that would make alo’s mission more economically attractive are unfortunately the same world conditions in which alo’s food systems will already be critically needed (at full capacity). For this purpose, alo is preparing now by locally growing healthier and better-tasting produce, working to be unaffected by supply chain interruptions, and on pace to be immune to seasonal, weather, economic, and social conditions. We feel alo’s mission is divinely inspired and worthy of serious reflection by anyone who can assist us in this effort.

Vote for this garden
3
votes

Anita’s Youth Garden

Chelsea, MA, United States
3
votes

Anita’s Youth Garden

Chelsea, MA, United States

GreenRoots is a community-based organization dedicated to improving public health outcomes in the densely populated, ultra-urban environment of Chelsea. Chelsea bears the brunt of industrial activity that powers the region; 80% of Chelsea’s land is impervious and over half is used for commercial or industrial purposes. With a population exceeding 45,000, approximately 75% of our residents identify as BIPOC, and 24% fall below the Federal Poverty Level. One in three Chelsea households participates in SNAP vs one in eight statewide. Chelsea High School’s graduation rate is 66%, and Chelsea youth face numerous challenges, including exposure to substances, gang activity, teen pregnancy, and fears surrounding immigration status.

However, Chelsea youth are resilient, and GreenRoots sees youth leadership development as an essential part of building healthy communities. The Environmental Chelsea Organizers (ECO) is a 6-member group of teens (ages 14-17) with a 20+ year track record of advocating for Chelsea youth. They work in our growing spaces, cultivating food alongside the Urban Farm Crew (UFC), our team of 2 young adults (ages 18-24) that assist garden operations. ECO and UFC alums leave our programs with hard and soft job skills and are well-equipped to attend college, pursue careers, and serve as role models in their communities.

GreenRoots recognizes the need to provide green oases for our community, and particularly our youth. Our community gardens provide pockets of safe, open space and respite in an ultra-urban environment. Additionally, our gardens produce meaningful quantities of food that are regularly distributed to food-insecure community members. We manage five successful community gardens, including Anita’s Youth Garden, a space reserved for local youth and their families to grow wholesome and culturally appropriate food. It abuts a beautiful new playground located within walking distance of Chelsea high school. Anita’s is a space for youth and by youth: ECO and UFC are empowered to claim the space as their own and learn to make decisions about how to equitably share the abundance of the garden. Elementary school science classes, local youth groups, and after-school programs are invited to use the garden as a meeting space. The garden features bilingual signage, low garden beds, and brightly colored adornments, making it welcoming and accessible. This is a sovereign space, giving youth agency, a sense of place, and the opportunity to get their hands in the dirt.

Vote for this garden
883
votes

Arcata Community Health and Wellness Garden

Arcata, CA, United States
883
votes

Arcata Community Health and Wellness Garden

Arcata, CA, United States

For nine years the Arcata Community Health and Wellness Garden has provided organic fruit and vegetables free to everyone in downtown Arcata, California, distributed produce to the patients at Open Door Community Health Centers, and supported the Arcata Presbyterian Church’s food program for our homeless residents. Our garden is planted with a wide variety of perennial fruit trees, native plants, medicinal and savory herbs, and a bounty of seasonal fruits and vegetables. This year, Cooperation Humboldt, a social change organization that believes healthy, nutritious food is a human right, took on stewardship of the garden from Open Door. We are working in partnership with the Wiyot Tribe, on whose land we all reside, Arcata Presbyterian Church, which leases us the garden site and maintains the permit; with Centro del Pueblo, which protects the dignity and diversity of all Humboldt County residents and visitors; with Full Cycle Compost, a bicycle-powered worker-owned cooperative that plans to install an education site in the garden this year; and with the Humboldt County Transition Partnership Program, an interagency vocational program with a goal to assist high school students with barriers to employment.

While in previous years, the garden was managed by two dedicated employees from Open Door, working four hours a week, this year Cooperation Humboldt’s Food Team is mobilizing our base of more than seventy Core Team Members and hundreds of active volunteers. Our Food Team also runs a free Mini-Garden installation program, which installed 227 mini-gardens for low-income residents in 2020, a free public fruit tree planting program with 50 trees in the ground and 100 to plant this year, a Little Free Pantry program with 25 free food pantries in three cities, and the Community Food Guide, and annual publication with a circulation of 15,000 copies that actively promotes access, equity, education, and empowerment in relation to our local food system. As the new stewards of this beautiful little gem in the heart of town, our goal is to increase community engagement and benefit by providing sanctuary space for all people, internship opportunities for at-risk youth, and educational programs for everyone. We will use the funds from Gardens For Good to pay for the lease and water, to repair the irrigation system, to create new educational signage in Wiyot, Spanish, Maya, Hmong, and English, and to purchase a few needed tools.

Vote for this garden
181
votes

Arlington Garden in Pasadena

Pasadena, CA, United States
181
votes

Arlington Garden in Pasadena

Pasadena, CA, United States

Arlington Garden is a climate-appropriate, habitat garden offering learning, inspiration, and enjoyment for all. It is the only public and free botanical garden in Pasadena; a community supported, water-wise garden that celebrates Southern California’s mediterranean climate. We endeavor to engage, educate and demonstrate how a climate-appropriate garden can be both beautiful and practical to maintain while incorporating the goals of water conservation and environmental sustainability. Arlington Garden offers inspirational beauty, an example of responsible land use, and a wonderful wildlife habitat.
Arlington Garden is located on the site of a 3 acre former CalTrans staging ground for the 710 freeway. The freeway was halted due to community opposition, but the denuded lot remained empty until the birth of the garden in 2005. Together, community members replenished the compacted soil, and planted a climate-appropriate, drought tolerant garden. Over the years, the mission of the garden has evolved to include promoting urban wildlife habitat and demonstrating the use of regenerative gardening techniques, which include refraining from the use of herbicides, pesticides, or chemical fertilizers. Thousands of visitors enjoy the garden every year, free of charge.
We have a volunteer program that has been running for 16 years and is continually evolving and growing. In the last year we have taken to steps to formalize our program and open it up to the wider Los Angeles County community. Our volunteers help maintain the garden, and we pride ourselves in that our orange grove was planted and maintained by volunteers, and they help harvest the organic oranges for marmalade every year, and help sell jars of marmalade as a fundraiser. Extra produce is donated.
We host a community co-op compost hub where residents can drop off their food scraps, with the finished product helping the orange grove thrive. We partner with local organizations, libraries, and schools to provide free educational programming on habitat and regenerative gardening, native plants, biodiversity, ecosystems, watersheds and water harvesting, and compost and soil health.
Our garden is maintained mostly by volunteers, and our programs are run by a small team of dedicated staff. This once “secret gem” of a garden has grown beyond everyone’s dreams, to a refuge for native flora and fauna, and people seeking a free, quiet respite and connection to nature. We are continually learning and growing with our community to be a safe haven to those seeking an open, green space to connect with.

Vote for this garden
785
votes

Arma Community Garden

Arma, KS, United States
785
votes

Arma Community Garden

Arma, KS, United States

The community garden in Arma, KS was established in 2019 by the city library’s Arma Nutrition Council. The city commission passed a policy that year to allow the council to locate our plot on city park land at no cost. The city also hooked up the water for free and pays the garden’s water bill. The garden is managed by the Nutrition Council’s Community Garden Committee and is worked by volunteers on Monday and Thursday mornings, and occasional Saturdays. The produce grown in the garden goes to the community food pantry at the library and is given away for free to anyone in need in Arma, a city with a 22% poverty rate. We also supplement the local high school’s student food pantry when we have large harvests. Our future plans are to install fruit trees, berry beds, and handicap accessible raised beds.

Our garden is managed by a group of resident-leaders who have taken it upon themselves to improve the health of their community by reducing the barriers their neighbors face when wanting to access healthy foods. The health of all 1,450 Arma residents, rich or poor, is negatively impacted by living over 9 miles away from the nearest grocer who offers healthy foods. Our food pantry is the only source of fresh food for many children from low-income households and homebound seniors living in the community. Our garden is special because it is a place where community members are becoming friends and volunteering together to get much needed social interaction. It even has benches for outdoor garden committee meetings. It also beautifies the community with its perennial flowers.

Our garden is inspiring because it was founded from a crowdfunding campaign that raised funds to buy a shed, tools, seeds, and plants as well as shelving and refrigerators for the food pantries at the library and high school. The whole community came together to pitch in. We even had folks we had never seen before coming into the library and hand over a couple crumpled up dollar bills because they thought what we were doing was important. Our garden is empowering because the local junior high students start our tomato and pepper transplants for us from seed. They get to learn about plant science, and also have opportunities to plant, water and weed the very plants they raised and take harvests from them home for their families to eat.

Vote for this garden
3
votes

ArtsXchange Fresh Oasis Community Garden

East Point, GA, United States
3
votes

ArtsXchange Fresh Oasis Community Garden

East Point, GA, United States

The ArtsXchange has been working with Tenisio Seanima, General Manager of Nature’s Candy Farms. He is also a member of the City of East Point’s Agricultural Steering Committee. Mr. Seanima installed the first raised beds at the ArtsXchange in 2019. We own our property. When the pandemic hit, we realized more than ever that we had to teach our community how to grow their own food. We are in a “food desert”; the food within driving distance is not nutritious, and we have an opportunity to educate the community on growing their own food through direct visits to the ArtsXchange, and we also through the video shorts that we share on social media. Our goal is to teach the community to grow where they live!

Vote for this garden
1078
votes

Ashamaawaso (s/he feeds a child)

London, ON, Canada
1078
votes

Ashamaawaso (s/he feeds a child)

London, ON, Canada

The Ashamaawaso (s/he feeds a child) food security program will serve urban Indigenous families in London, Ontario once Nshwaasnangong Child Care and Family Centre opens in the Summer of 2021. Due to high rates of insecure housing and poverty among urban Indigenous peoples there is often a reliance on nutrient-poor store-bought foods to meet dietary requirements. Access to and consumption of fresh, nutrient rich and traditional foods are important methods for alleviating food insecurity and improving health among Indigenous peoples. As per SOAHAC’s Our Health Counts London community driven health survey 1 in 5 (20%) of Indigenous adults in London indicated that they and others in their household sometimes or often did not have enough to eat.

Nshwaasnangong has already allotted for green houses, planter boxes and a large outdoor space dedicated to gardening. Nshwaasnangong staff firmly believes the garden initiative is one way of helping to restore some food sovereignty. Food has the power to revitalize local traditions, improve people’s health and ultimately lessens the community’s dependence on budget friendly nutrient-poor store-bought foods. With this garden we will engage Indigenous youth in age appropriate ways as well as their families in preparing the land, planting seeds and tending plants using traditional agricultural techniques, including re-learning planting songs and ceremonies from local Elders and Knowledge Keepers. We look forward to planting the three sisters (corn, beans and squash) and other crops such as beets, lettuces, carrots, cucumbers, tomatoes, strawberries, sunflowers, etc. as well as traditional medicines (sage, cedar, sweetgrass and tobacco). Money from the Gardens for Good Grant would help us purchase the aforementioned traditional and non-GMO seeds from various sources to build our seed bank; gardening tools so that community members both large and small can help tend the plants and harvest; as well as materials for our own compost pile which would help us decrease our carbon footprint and repurpose food waste that will occur through the child care and family centres into fertilizer as well as provide honorariums for Elders and Knowledge Keepers who will help us relearn songs, ceremonies and traditional agricultural knowledge. The garden will provide many hours of programming and nourish our community members spirits and bellies. We hope to share the harvest with our community via food boxes and community means and at the end of the season we will anticipate participating in various drying and canning sessions as well as seed saving.

Vote for this garden
205
votes

Athens Southside Community Garden

Athens, OH, United States
205
votes

Athens Southside Community Garden

Athens, OH, United States

Community Food Initiatives (CFI) has been developing, organizing, and managing community garden spaces in Appalachian Ohio for 28 years. Our mission is to create equitable access to healthy, local food in our community, where rates of poverty and food insecurity are the highest in our state (ACF Report, 2016). Driven by this goal, we maintain multifaceted programs that not only distribute over 100,000 lb. of local produce yearly, but empower people of all ages and socioeconomic backgrounds with the resources and knowledge to grow their own food.

Across our four Community Gardens, CFI works to eliminate barriers to involvement by providing families no-cost access to plots, tools, irrigation, and educational workshops. Our culinary workshops show families how to utilize produce from the garden in their cooking, while our gardening workshops teach sustainable agriculture and uphold indigenous practices such as permaculture, crop rotation, polyculture and water harvesting. Our designated “donation plots” engage a multitude of community organizations, interns, university students, Master Gardeners, and volunteers of all ages to grow produce for distribution to food insecure families through our Donation Station. CFI’s Community Garden programming furthers our mission by cultivating supportive and resilient communities.

This project focuses on our Southside Community Garden, located adjacent to a low-income housing development where families rent apartments without spaces to garden. Amidst a concrete jungle, this Monarch Waystation garden is truly a bright, colorful oasis full of potential. Funding will support increased garden engagement, education, and physical improvements. To enhance children’s opportunities in the garden, we will establish kid-sized plots, purchase kid-friendly garden tools, and host hands-on, interactive children’s workshops. Children will learn to grow food in their own plots, and help to care for our donation plots. To engage community members of all ages, we will bring in experts to host workshops in composting, companion planting, season extension, and more. Additionally, we will purchase a rain barrel system and season extension supplies to enhance the quality and volume of produce grown, increasing support for the success of gardeners in the Southside Community Garden. Increasing food access programming is crucial in Athens County, Ohio, where poverty rates double the statewide average and 1 in 4 children are food insecure (Feeding America, 2018). By investing in the Southside Community Garden Project, Nature’s Path will support CFI to uplift low-income children and adults alike through the transformative experience of successfully growing their own food.

Vote for this garden
400
votes

Bad River Tribe’s Sovereign Tea Gardens

Odanah, WI, United States
400
votes

Bad River Tribe’s Sovereign Tea Gardens

Odanah, WI, United States

Hello from The Bad River Band of Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians in Ashland County, Wisconsin. The Bad River Tribe established the Food Sovereignty Initiative (FSI) 11 years ago to increase tribal resiliency and sovereignty over its food system. We are requesting funding for our Sovereign Tea Gardens. The gardens are a joint project of our Tribe’s youth, elders, and friends and are in the shape of a turtle and bear. We have created delicious tea blends from growing, harvesting and drying plants, and share tea to bring healing, comfort and joy.

Vote for this garden
2
votes

Baker Hill Community Garden

Whitchurch–Stouffville, ON, Canada
2
votes

Baker Hill Community Garden

Whitchurch–Stouffville, ON, Canada

The Baker Hill Community Garden is a place where community members grow and connect. Going into its third growing season, the garden has flourished in both physical growth and in growers capacity. The garden was started by a community member who recognized the lack of access to gardening spaces within the community and the need for fresh produce at our community food bank. The landowner generously sectioned off some of her land to allow for plots, a garden shed, and a parking lot to be established.

The garden has individual plots for those interested in growing for themselves, and a community plot where all produce is then donated to the local food bank and meal program. In its two summers, the garden has donated copious amounts of produce to the food bank, often more than the food bank could give out. This year the community plots harvest will be split between the food bank and a new community initiative, The Good Food Project. The initiative prepared and distributes meals to food-stressed residents within the community. The garden is assisting in providing access to fresh, nutritious, locally grown food, while also providing an opportunity for growers to grow.

The Baker Hill Community Garden would use the funds to purchase two raised container beds, plants, woodchips, picnic tables and umbrellas, signage, and garden tools. The raised container beds are to provide accessibility for those who cannot bend over or kneel to the garden. The woodchips will be used to define the paths in between beds. The picnic tables will give growers a shaded spot to sit and connect with other growers. New signage is needed as the garden has grown in size, to distinguish what is being grown, to distinguish plots, and to inform gardeners about garden rules. And of course, plants will be used for growing! This application is being completed by the Good Food Project, to support the Baker Hill Community Garden in their growth, as they will be supporting us by providing fresh food.

Vote for this garden
2
votes

Bayvale Elementary School Garden

Augusta, GA, United States
2
votes

Bayvale Elementary School Garden

Augusta, GA, United States

The learning garden at Bayvale Elementary is a school garden where students are engaged in inquiry-based and hands-on learning in an outdoor classroom setting. Through this wonderful place, students benefit from exposure to a natural, outdoor learning environment and gain an understanding of where their food comes from. Students are able to identify and experience different fruits and vegetables and learn to make healthy life-long choices.

Vote for this garden
1
votes

Bee Happy

Falls Church, VA, United States
1
votes

Bee Happy

Falls Church, VA, United States

Food Uniting Neighbor’s (FUN’s) Mission is to establish vegetable gardens and food forests in diverse suburban neighborhoods as a means to provide fresh produce to local food banks. As the gardens are established, FUN will encourage and enlist volunteers from the local community, and teach methods of growing food and maintaining gardens. Addressing food insecurity within our own community is incredibly important to FUN, and the need has only grown because of COVID. FUN’s project is an organic garden and food forest, called Bee Happy, in honor of our beehives on site. Located on the front lawn of a church, it has 10 raised beds with 10 more to be added May 1st, constructed of locally sourced cedar. This will be a barrier-free, fully inclusive garden including some paved paths along with high-sided raised beds to accommodate gardeners who use wheelchairs and provide volunteering opportunities for individuals living with paralysis and mobility limitations. FUN uses organic seeds, starting some crops indoors and other direct sown in the garden, following organic gardening methods. This year will be the first time we plant and harvest at Bee Happy. Once the vegetable garden is completed, FUN will begin work on the food forest, installing a switchback trail on the hill behind the garden. Native edible plant groupings will border the trail.

All food grown at Bee Happy, along with the honey, will be donated to 2 food pantries within 1.5 miles of the garden. The Spend Yourself Food Pantry clients are from 55 different countries with the majority from Central America, Vietnam, and United States, serves 300-400 families weekly with a noticeable increase in elderly clients. Dar Al Hijrah Mosque Food Bank serves 275-300 families each week. FUN’s volunteer base consists of people from the neighborhood, gardening teams from the mosque and the church, as well as food pantry clients. We are in talks with a local Spina Bifida organization, Veteran’s group, and our county’s Department of Family Services to recruit gardeners who use wheelchairs as we truly want an all-inclusive volunteer force. The prize would be used for the following: 1) a fence around the garden to keep out deer 2) ancillary equipment such as hand tools for volunteers, weather-proof storage box, food scale, garbage can for waste that can’t go into compost 3) canning jars for honey and beehive frames 5) food forest trail excavation and native edible plants.

Vote for this garden
3
votes

Belvedere Peace Garden

Decatur, GA, United States
3
votes

Belvedere Peace Garden

Decatur, GA, United States

The Peace Belvedere Garden was built in 2013 in partnership with Peace Lutheran Church. Partners in Action for Healthy Living manages, maintains, and supports the members of the community garden. Over 60% of the garden plots in our garden are used by our organization to grow food to donate to the local food banks and food pantries. We saw a 400% increase in the need for food during COVID-19. The remaining garden plots are used by local community members to grow their own food with instructional assistance from our organization. Our community members donate over 10% of their produce to donate to people in need as well. Our “Grow to Give” program is what makes our garden special. We provide opportunities for adults and children to help us grow food to donate in a time of crisis. During this difficult season, we may not have money to give; but giving our time and labor to help put food on a family’s table is rewarding. We provide opportunities to sow, grow, and give.

Vote for this garden
363
votes

Ben Franklin Community Garden

Cleveland, OH, United States
363
votes

Ben Franklin Community Garden

Cleveland, OH, United States

Located in the heart of urban Cleveland, Ohio, Ben Franklin Community Garden the largest community garden in Cuyahoga County. Since 1981, the five-acre site is one of the city’s earliest examples of the development and use of eco-friendly urban space. With over 200 plots and on average 180 gardeners per year, Ben Franklin Community Garden is located on the back portion of Benjamin Franklin Elementary School, part of the Cleveland Metropolitan School District. The garden is a program of the Old Brooklyn Community Development Corporation, a non-profit 501(c)(3). In 2005, the garden was designated a Cleveland Landmark by the Cleveland Landmarks Commission, and in 2013 the Ben Franklin Community Garden was zoned an “Urban Garden District” via City Ordinance No. 825-l0. The garden strongly recommends organic gardening practices including organic composting and garden rules prohibit the use of Sevin and inorganic herbicides.

Ben Franklin Community Garden is not only a place of community for gardeners but seeks to educate and aid our youngest to our oldest Clevelanders. The garden area includes a children’s garden, a perennial garden, and a demonstration garden used to educate elementary to college aged students on gardening practices. Gardeners are encouraged to donate a portion of their harvest each year and respond generously by providing thousands of pounds of vegetables and fruit to local food banks, churches, pantries, and elderly neighbors in need. Additionally, gardeners donate over a thousand hours each year to help maintain the garden; including growing and delivering produce to hunger centers, removing trees and brush, keeping all tools in working order and assisting in garden social events.

The dedication of the gardeners is amazing; there is an overall sense of community pride and spirit at the garden each year. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the garden has been a safe place to see neighbors and a reminder of perseverance during difficult times. 2021 is a big year for the garden as we turn 40 years old. We look forward to celebrating with the same sense of service and love for our neighbors that has made the garden a success these past 40 years. A grant from Nature’s Path would give us funding to keep providing tools, soil, and maintenance for the garden so that gardeners can continue to donate portions of their harvests to serve low-income adults, children, and families in our urban neighborhood.

Vote for this garden
2
votes

Bengal’s Community Garden

Ridgeway, VA, United States
2
votes

Bengal’s Community Garden

Ridgeway, VA, United States

The Bengal’s Community Garden is a project hosted at Bassett High School, in which the school’s FFA club built raised bed gardens for the horticulture classes to plant and tend to crops that will be donated to our food pantry’s Family Food Program. The progress, beginning with empty beds, and ending with needy families selecting from fresh, locally grown produce will be detailed on our website and social media — to educate the community on the needs of the impoverished, as well as the benefits of raised bed gardens.

Vote for this garden
59
votes

Betty Ann Sands Memorial Healing and Artful Garden

Washington, NC, United States
59
votes

Betty Ann Sands Memorial Healing and Artful Garden

Washington, NC, United States

The Pamlico Rose Institute (PRI), founded in 2106, is a Washington, NC 501 (c) (3) and advances wellness programs for at-risk women Veterans as part of a broader community and regionally based integrated public health prevention strategy. PRI’s home is the Rose Haven Center of Healing located in Washington’s historic district, three blocks from the Pamlico River. Purchased by PRI in 2017, the Center consists of a renovated 1892 farmhouse, adjacent barn, and ½ block of healing landscape. A major part of that landscape is the Betty Ann Sands Memorial Healing and Artful Gardens. PRI’s Total Life Fitness (TLF) wellness program is an integrated and holistic mind, body, and soul approach to healthy living that helps mitigate risk factors, such as trauma, anxiety, and stress that can lead to suicide and advance protective factors as effective suicide prevention. The foundation of TLF rests on four pillars; nature, creative expression, movement, and building community. These pillars are expressed throughout the Sands Gardens in raised bed vegetable garden, a community gathering space, meditation gardens, reflection stations, displays of art, with portals, arbors, footbridge, and walkways throughout, and all elements of the gardens accessible to all abilities. An extensive garden labyrinth, also accessible to all abilities, is now under development with completion by the summer of 2021.

PRI’s prevention strategy for 2021 revolves around mitigating food insecurity and social isolation in at-risk women Veterans, two primary risk factors in the growing crisis of Veteran suicide. A 2018 study in Women’s Health Issues found that 27.6% of women veterans were “food insufficient.” Through an Urban Farming program, and in partnership with AmeriCorps and the Boys and Girls Club, the Sands Gardens will expand their produce garden as one of four sites in two counties supported by women Veterans turned AmeriCorps members as part of a Wellness Corps. In addition, as part of the Urban farming project, the Sands Gardens will gain a greenhouse and pilot an environmentally controlled aeroponics “garden” while also using its capacity as a seed starter for the more traditional urban agricultural sites in the project.

Vote for this garden
30
votes

BGCNEO Broadway Club Garden

Cleveland, OH, United States
30
votes

BGCNEO Broadway Club Garden

Cleveland, OH, United States

Boys & Girls Clubs of Northeast Ohio’s (BGCNEO’s) Broadway Club is unique among the organization’s 14 Cleveland-based sites, as it is home to a horticulture program that provides members and the surrounding community with access to fresh, organic produce in the heart of an urban neighborhood. The Broadway Club Garden boasts two hoop houses, an outdoor plant and herb garden, and a hydroponic garden tower, all utilized for growing a variety of organic herbs, fruits, and vegetables. Teen Club members serve as summer workers, helping to prepare the garden for planting, tending to plants as they grow, and harvesting produce once it reaches peak growth. The garden yield is then provided to Club members and their families free of charge and is also offered for sale to BGCNEO staff and community members at local farmers markets. Recent data shows that 50% of Clevelanders reside in a food desert, making the Broadway Garden a critical component of the effort to address the lack of access to fresh fruits and vegetables for city residents. Additionally, the garden produce is a beneficial asset to BGCNEO’s Cooking Club, where members learn how to cook and season simple, healthy meals utilizing seasonal fresh vegetables and herbs grown and picked right at the Club. Through participation in horticulture programming, BGCNEO members learn valuable lessons on where food comes from and how to cook with fresh fruits, vegetables, and herbs, while also gaining entrepreneurship and customer service experience through the sale of produce.

Currently, BGCNEO is fundraising to help support the installation of an irrigation system for the Broadway Garden. This project includes the installation of new piping and heads in both hoop houses, as well as piping, hoses and spray heads for the outdoor gardens, programmable timers for each hoop house, and the installation of a hose spigot at each house for additional watering needs. This irrigation system will help reduce water usage and decrease weed growth, improving the overall production capability and sustainability of the Broadway Garden for years to come.

Vote for this garden
51
votes

Black Diamond Backyard

Greensboro, NC, United States
51
votes

Black Diamond Backyard

Greensboro, NC, United States

Founded in 2013 Black Diamond Backyard is a nearly 2 acre wild and rambling plot located on the edge of downtown Greensboro and along the last leg of the Downtown Greenway Loop (to be completed Fall 2021). Our garden straddles two distinct neighborhoods, one upper middle class with mostly homeowners and the other low income mostly renters, allowing for a dynamic social exchange in a fantastic urban green setting that feels almost rural at times.

In 2013 we obtained a free 10 year lease from the Guilford County School system with an opportunity to renew for another 10 years in 2023 with hopes to actually purchase the land through grants once we have officially filed for our official 501(c)(3) status in March. However, as of right now the garden and orchard are maintained by our founder, a core of three volunteers, and of course, folks from the surrounding neighborhoods and is funded 100% from donations.

With over 200 fruiting shrubs and trees and over 30 large garden plots, we offer a unique space where folks can garden, forage, and socialize. Covid-19 showed us just how important our garden/orchard was to our community this past year and folks were extremely grateful to have a place outdoors where conviviality felt safe and reassuring. Anticipating even more interest this Spring we need even more garden beds and another water source for the opposite end of the garden.

Vote for this garden
678
votes

Black Urban Farmers Association

French Camp, CA, United States
678
votes

Black Urban Farmers Association

French Camp, CA, United States

Founded in 2015, The mission of the Black Urban Farmers Association (BUFA) is to promote a healthy lifestyle by providing fresh, locally grown, pesticide free vegetables & herbs that highlight African American cuisine & a plant based diet. Our goal is to empower the Black community by promoting healthy eating & education in an urban farm setting. BUFA specializes in legacy crops catering to African Americans featuring greens, okra, black eye peas & more. We are dedicated to selecting crops that promote health, and believe in a diverse selection of food, aiming to introduce new vegetables and innovative ways to prepare & enjoy them. Located on an acre of farmland that we lease from a generous farmer for $1 annually, we are a group of volunteer farmers, committed to healthy soil, sustainable farming and good agricultural practices. All fresh vegetables, herbs & fruit are grown locally and without pesticides. We are inspired by the history of Black farmers in the United States and the contributions they made & continue to make in the arena of healthy food. We promote healthy eating through educational classes taught by our farmers, including one of our founders who is a master gardener and master food preserver. We increase access to fresh produce in our community through local farmers market sales, roadside stands, restaurant sales & sales to local area chefs. Our work is vital, as 1 in 4 children in our region lack reliable access to affordable and nutritious food, and therefore often have negative health outcomes. Furthermore, almost half of the youth in our Central Valley region are overweight and obese, with African American children having higher obesity rates. In 2020, we partnered with the Edible Schoolyard project in Stockton. They purchased approximately 2,000 pounds of our freshly grown produce and donated it to St. Mary’s Dining Room in Stockton, where they serve over 700 meals a day to the over 111,000 homeless and those facing food insecurity just in our county. Our organization provides indispensable services, including impacting food insecurity, providing volunteer opportunities and education to underserved members of our community, and creating partnerships with other non-profits for maximum community outreach. If funded, we would use the money to purchase a greenhouse to increase our production capacity and for supplies to expand our education to local youth.

Vote for this garden
43
votes

Bloom Community Farm

Hailey, ID, United States
43
votes

Bloom Community Farm

Hailey, ID, United States

Our garden is a good for you place. Community members value four main garden focuses:
a) free vegetable access
b) social connection
c) learning more about growing food
d) ability to engage family and friends in the space.

Currently 1.5 acres of vegetables, flowers, fruits, compost, and chickens host over 200 community members annually at Bloom Community Farm. People come to volunteer, grow their own row, participate in gardening and cooking classes, and some youth participate in job skills development by running a discount market.

This summer of 2021, after 4 successful seasons, we will relocate to a permanent 5 acre home, greatly expanding our gardening experiential education and social connection space, which the community is asking for. Our garden is officially growing from the pilot phase into maturity, and we seek additional funding to achieve these changes. The physical move of the farm was expected all along (we are working with the same landowner), and we are excited to build our new home just a few hundred yards away, with many lessons learned in our back pockets as we do so! The new farm location will permanently reside in a community conversation easement.

Here are the community’s own words (from surveys) about their experiences:
1)“This gives me an opportunity to volunteer with my children and bring home ‘new to us’ veggies.”
2)“My favorite moments are just being out there – helping my community and getting to know new people.”
3)“I need to eat really clean and fresh by doctor’s orders, and Bloom makes this food accessible to me.”
4) I don’t want my own garden plot; I want to work with others and learn from the larger garden picture”
5)” We love helping support the community. We come to release from the stress of work-life and value the connections with all types of people. We’d like to spend more time in the garden in retirement.”

With the expansion, Bloom Community Farm will continue to emphasize the focus points listed previously. In addition, the increased food will continue to supply our mother organization, The Hunger Coalition, and its new commercial kitchen, free choice food pantry, and free children’s summer meals programs. Community members are at the core of all programs; they are the magic that makes these programs take life. And the new Bloom Community Farm is their core connection to this direct action!

Vote for this garden
1
votes

Bosque Medicine Farm

Portland, OR, United States
1
votes

Bosque Medicine Farm

Portland, OR, United States

At Bosque Medicine Farm, we strive to hold space and educational offerings to guide our community toward a culture of sovereignty, reciprocity, land connection & stewardship, community, and ceremony. Our intention is to share a space where we can weave in sovereignty, education, and ceremony. Our education offerings includes (but not limited to) free, sliding scale, donation based classes in how to seed save, grow food, closed-loop regenerative living, plant medicine, plant journeys, and holding space for innerwork. We will be participating at the farmers market (food and plant medicine) for the first time this year and will be hosting seed swap, and food shares.

Also, since we are fairly new, we are striving to get ourselves into the wider community and offer bilingual or spanish offering as well, later this year. We are super passionate about reclaiming soverignty & community to support and inspire each other.

Vote for this garden
2
votes

Brazos Valley Oasis

College Station, TX, United States
2
votes

Brazos Valley Oasis

College Station, TX, United States

The Brazos Valley Oasis is a Community Garden that provides gardening and greening opportunities for the physical and social benefit of the people and neighborhoods of the Brazos Valley. The area where our garden is located is actually a Food Desert by the USDA standards. By giving individuals the chance to grow food for themselves and for donation, we intend to increase healthy activities while creating a productive and beautiful commons. Our garden will be changing locations to the Lincoln Center in College Station, Texas, a well documented underserved, minority area. Currently managing a 65 acre pineapple farm in the Virgin Islands where community service hours with local youth are offered every 1st and 3rd Saturdays, monthly.

Vote for this garden
125
votes

C.B. Community School Garden

Philadelphia, PA, United States
125
votes

C.B. Community School Garden

Philadelphia, PA, United States

C.B. Community Schools is excited to be considered for a Gardens for Good grant to support our spring urban gardening course and school community garden for high school students in the child welfare system in Philadelphia, PA. In 2015, recognizing the dire need for a new kind of high school for the most vulnerable young people in the child welfare system in Philadelphia, C.B. Community Schools (CB) was created to serve students who are at risk of institutional placement, young parents, involved in the justice system, or at risk of dropping out. Our 70 resilient students, ages 14-21, deal with the emotional scars left by years of abuse and neglect.

Coming from the understanding that trauma does impact learning, CB uses a healing-centered model based on a peace and justice framework. Competency-Based academics integrated with full Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) services and postsecondary counseling ensure that our students are prepared for graduation and have a clear path forward toward independence. CB combines project-based interdisciplinary learning with real world experiences to teach life skills and job readiness. Our students graduate from CB with a sense of agency, postsecondary skills and a lifelong community supporting them into adulthood.

This spring, CB will start an urban gardening elective course and a student gardening internship! Students will gain hands-on experience building raised beds on our school campus as they learn about gardening, sustainable agriculture and food systems. Students will explore the racial and economic histories that lead us to our current food systems as they think critically about how food systems have been used as a source of community empowerment and sustainability or a source of power and control. CB will run a summer internship providing stipends to student interns who will manage the garden. CB interns will distribute the organic produce that we grow to our students and their families to help reduce food insecurity in our community.

98% of CB students are BIPOC and 100% live below the poverty line in neighborhoods with high rates of violence and limited access to fresh, organic produce. Our students and alumni in the child welfare system struggled significantly with food insecurity during the pandemic. Our CB urban gardening course and internship will not only contribute to increasing the economic and food security of our students, it will teach them the lifelong skills to sustainably grow their own food!

Vote for this garden
158
votes

Cadillac Urban Gardens

Detroit, MI, United States
158
votes

Cadillac Urban Gardens

Detroit, MI, United States

Cadillac Urban Gardens on Merritt, affectionately known as CUGM or Cadillac Urban Gardens, is a 0.8-acre urban garden located in Mexicantown, Southwest Detroit on the former grounds of the Cadillac Clark Street Plant’s Executive parking lot. In 2012 as a community collaboration between Southwest Detroit Environmental Vision (SDEV), the Ideal Group, General Motors (GM), residents, non-profits, businesses, schools, and other local community organizations, CUGM was developed with and for the community in mind. This garden since 2012 has been able to repurpose 331 shipping containers from GM and utilize them as our raised beds to grow fresh produce the community can harvest without cost. CUGM provides a space for community members to come together to grow fresh fruits and vegetables, promote food sovereignty, and beautify their neighborhood through place-based intergenerational learning. In turn, the garden provides food security for residents with little access to garden space and or fresh produce and has become a model for sustainable gardening practices as residents grow and harvest produce within walking distance of their homes. Since 2012 over 60,000 hours of service have occurred within CUGM with volunteers and visitors coming from all across the State of Michigan, the country, and the world. Without the hard work and dedication of our Southwest Detroit community and volunteers, this garden would not be possible. Since its inception, over 10.5 tons (23,170 ponds) of metal have been prevented from entering the waste stream as well as the implementation of more efficient water use strategies via rain catchment systems. Additionally, in 2020 alone 1.9 tons (3,805 pounds) of free, fresh produce were distributed to over 700 Detroit residents between the months of July and October. CUGM not only helps create a system of equitable access and availability of culturally relevant food across Southwest Detroit but develops the tools needed for residents young and old to become leaders within their own communities. Here at CUGM, we don’t just grow produce, but leaders and environmental stewards who have already begun to enact change regarding food access and health across Southwest Detroit.

Vote for this garden
335
votes

Caldwell County Christian Ministries (CCCM) Pantry

Lockhart, TX, United States
335
votes

Caldwell County Christian Ministries (CCCM) Pantry

Lockhart, TX, United States

The Caldwell County Christian Ministries (CCCM) Food Pantry Garden is growing in all respects. The 5,000 square foot garden was tended by other organizations in prior years, but was fallow in 2019 and became the Pantry Garden in 2020. CCCM leases the site from the City of Lockhart, who partners with us in reinvigorating the garden by fencing site, tilling ground, granting water access and providing mulch. The city is supportive of the Pantry Garden providing nutrient-dense, organic vegetables for the community.

In 2020, the garden manager and 15 volunteers contributed 490 hours resulting in 550 pounds of produce for the pantry which are not normally distributed by the Central Texas Food Bank, such as leafy greens, tomatoes, and radishes. We had 10 raised beds, and then added 9 in-ground beds for the fall.
Pantry clients appreciate fresh-picked produce, so the garden is now expanding by planting another 1,800 square feet of in-ground rows. Lockhart soil is fertile blackland, which is dense. Our dirt is enhanced with mushroom compost. We constantly renew soil nutrients with compost made by combining food waste from the pantry with neighborhood leaves. The garden manager recently gave high school students a hands-on lesson about how compost contributes to the living ecosystem of healthy soil. The students now add their lunch scraps of fruit and vegetables to our compost pile.

The garden volunteers range from school children to retirees. They volunteer because they want to learn about gardening, get their hands dirty and have a heart for serving food-insecure individuals and families. The garden manager is happy to share her passion for growing organic produce and sustainably feeding people. Volunteers enjoy the physical, mental, and spiritual benefits of working the land, and may take home produce for their own kitchens. The pantry clients are realizing what a bonus it is to have fresh, organic produce as part of their monthly distribution basket. The garden is a win-win for participating individuals and the whole community. Plans for the 2021 growing seasons are now underway and include expansion of the garden to 14 raised beds, 9 in-ground long rows and a new herb garden. This year’s garden will include nutritious greens, tomatoes, eggplant, peppers, cantaloupe, pumpkin and herbs. In the future, we would like to add more tools, fruit trees and a greenhouse. We have a lot more growing to do!

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