How to Host a Kids Tea Party

Kids have always liked tea parties. Perhaps you remember days from your childhood when you gathered a motley group of dolls and stuffed animals around a table or blanket and served imaginary tea in tiny cups. When the winners of the EnviroKidz annual contest went on their EnviroTrip to Australia, everyone had great fun learning about koalas at the Australian Koala Foundation.

One highlight of the event was a–you guessed it–tea party. Although koalas dressed in their finest did not attend, the party was hosted on the foundation’s grounds. It gave folks a bit of a break during the day to spend time with new and old friends. The party was so much fun that everyone at home should get the opportunity to experience a great tea party, too. Hosting is an amazing experience, and as you prepare, keep the following seven elements in mind.

 

1. Invitations

Invitations are so obvious they can be easy to forget about until a week before the party. That said, one of the most fun aspects about hosting a tea party is a return to old-fashioned traditions. You can opt for online or postal mail invitations, but either way, include details such as the purpose of the party, the date, time, location and RSVP information. For example, take a look at the EnviroKidz tea party invitations here. Send invitations about a month before the party date if possible.

 

2. Theme

There is no limit to the themes you can choose for a tea party. If you’re having a hard time deciding, a princess theme or a theme based on the latest Disney movie is always good. How about a vintage theme in which everyone wears old dresses and hats? Alternatively, you could follow the EnviroKidz example, have an animal-themed party, and ask for donations to save a type of animal.

 

3. Decor

You can probably find everything you need from a party store. If you’re feeling creative, check out this page on Pinterest. It’s great for animal-themed parties in particular. For an additional touch of elegance, create tea party menus that include details on the food and teas being served. For example, you can list where the tea comes from.

 

4. Food

The traditional aim of tea parties has been to enjoy the strong taste of tea, with the food serving as a complement. So, think small and simple when it comes to tea party food: cookies, squares and mini-cakes are great choices, for example. Healthy food can be delicious, too; read these recipes for grape popspeanut butter and banana sushi, and mini cupcakes.

 

5. Games

Kids are full of energy, and tea parties need not be dull affairs where everyone just sits and sips tea. Break out the games! About Parenting has details on popular games such as sleeping lions and elephant trumpet, but you can modify the names and some details (such as the elephant trumpet sounds) to fit your theme if it is not an animal theme. If the tea party is for an older age range of children, then card games can be great fun.

 

6. Tea

Almost last but definitely not least is the tea. The so-called guest of honor deserves careful consideration; organic, herbal tea is good. Options include organic African nectar and chocolate rooibos. Don’t be afraid to experiment!

 

7. The Parents

Guess what? This can be your tea party too! Invite the parents of the children who are attending. It’s a great way to make new friends and to create new traditions.

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