5 Spooky Halloween Science Projects Kids Will Love

Science experiments are so much fun for a variety of ages, and what better way to celebrate Halloween than with a couple of eerily fun projects? These activities provide the opportunity to discuss chemical reactions while getting you in the Halloween spirit. Here are 5 that you can do as a family with only a few simple materials!

 

1. Halloween Slime

5 Spooky Halloween Science Projects Kids Will Love | Nature's Path

Whip up a simple slime recipe using borax, or opt for a non-borax recipe, and add orange glitter and Halloween confetti for some added fun! Hollow out some mini pumpkins and play with the slimy mixture over and over again.

 

2. Erupting Ghost

A spin on the classic Mentos and Coke experiment, draw a ghostly face on a bottle of Sprite Zero. Drop a package of Mentos into the bottle and watch your ghost erupt! Kids go crazy over this one.

 

3. Eyeball Oobleck

5 Spooky Halloween Science Projects Kids Will Love | Nature's Path

Make a batch of oobleck by adding equal parts cornstarch and water in a plastic bin or on a baking sheet. Add some candy eyeballs if doing this with small children, or plastic googly eyes with older children. The oobleck has a really fun feel as it looks like a liquid, but feels like a solid.

 

4. Inflatable Ghost

This a classic science experiment – the reaction between baking soda and vinegar to inflate a balloon! Make it Halloween-themed by drawing eyes and a mouth on a clear or white balloon. Simply fill an empty water bottle halfway with vinegar and using a funnel, add some baking soda to the deflated balloon. Slide the balloon over the opening of the bottle and let the baking soda fall into the bottle. The balloon will immediately inflate!

 

5. Melt the Witch Hands

This is such an easy set-up and tons of fun to play with! Fill a latex glove with colored water and freeze overnight. Remove the frozen hand from the glove and experiment with using salt and warm water to melt the ‘witch hand’. Your kids will quickly see how both of these materials affect the ice.

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